Album art size, and how to rip "continous" discs.

Discuss Max, an open source CD audio extractor and audio converter.
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Json
Posts: 4
Joined: Fri Feb 01, 2008 9:03 am

Album art size, and how to rip "continous" discs.

Post by Json » Mon Mar 17, 2008 1:56 pm

Hi,

I have a suggestion and a question. First the suggestion:
When using Max to retrieve album art a list with the picture is presented along with the size of the image in pixels. I would really love to also be able to see how big the album art data will be (in KBytes). The reason for this is that the media software I use doesn't like too big album art.
Sometimes I have to "re-insert" album art using Media Rage (the pictures it finds seem to be smaller, in KBytes, for some reason).
Side note: Album art in Tag would be wonderful! :wink:

Second, a question. How would I go about to rip a disc where the music has track stops, but there are no audible gaps, like for instance opera discs?
I must say that I haven't tried to rip any yet, so maybe "it just works", but just thought I'd ask anyway.

Mike1
Posts: 201
Joined: Thu Sep 21, 2006 3:55 pm

Re: Album art size, and how to rip "continous" discs.

Post by Mike1 » Mon Mar 17, 2008 10:30 pm

Json wrote:Second, a question. How would I go about to rip a disc where the music has track stops, but there are no audible gaps, like for instance opera discs?
You can set Max to rip as a single file, if you'd see the alternative as artificially breaking up what's actually continuous by putting in gaps where there really aren't any. Go to:

Preferences > Ripper

Then select "Rip to a single file" and "Generate cuesheet". However, this does limit you in terms of what software you can play back the file in. AFAIK, it'd also be highly unsuitable if you were using the files with a portable player like an iPod, since those prefer smaller files. But it's something some audio buffs like to do for the reason I gave in the first sentence there. And most of those people probably only do it for archival purposes -- i.e., for making a single file that's a faithful copy of the original CD including gap-length, so that they can, so to speak, "recreate" the CD if it gets damaged -- and not for listening.

It's a matter of personal preference. You can do as above, if that appeals, but you can rip and encode as normal and Max will find the beginnings and ends of tracks, and the CD will split into separate tracks just fine if that's what you want.

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