Max the right tool to clone Audio CDs?

Ask questions and get answers on how to make Max behave.
Post Reply
Emilia

Max the right tool to clone Audio CDs?

Post by Emilia » Sun Oct 01, 2006 2:51 pm

Hi,
I am new to Max and was acually more looking for an exact Audio-CD copy tool rather than a ripper to format xyz...

I tried the "get all songs in one file" option (as AIFF) with a cue sheet and tried to convince Toast to burn this related to some hints here to tweak the cue file before using the cue/bin copy option from Toast.

The result is a rubbish and a wasted CD-ROM :-(
Is there a simple "Howto" for Audio-CD copy?

Thanks, Emilia

Emilia

Re: Max the right tool to clone Audio CDs?

Post by Emilia » Wed Oct 04, 2006 9:06 am

Looks like the answer is no..... ? :oops:

Does anybody by chance know a good Audio-CD clone program? :wink:

Thanks, Emilia

User avatar
Fuga
Posts: 391
Joined: Mon Jun 05, 2006 8:30 pm
Location: Texas

Post by Fuga » Wed Oct 04, 2006 10:59 am

And to what purpose do you wish to clone? Preservation? Duplication?

If the former, as with most other types of data archiving, compression is helpful as storage space is critical. Besides RAR or ZIP (mere data compression) audio data benefits from having compression schemes that are also functional. FLAC and it's siblings compress and play. Most folk FLAC or whatever and then save to DVD data discs.

If the latter, your choices run a continuum of relative perfection. If you have two drives you can merely fire up Toast, choose Audio, choose Audio CD, insert the original into one drive, insert a blank into the other, and click burn. Not much to it. For duplicationost here use Max (but Max can do so much mre) to rip an AIFF file using one of Max's rippers for more quality assurance and then burn. The reputedly most secure ripper is Exact Audio Copy on Windows. There's your continuum: Toast>EAC.

Emilia

Post by Emilia » Wed Oct 04, 2006 9:26 pm

Fuga wrote:And to what purpose do you wish to clone? Preservation? Duplication?
Duplication
Fuga wrote: If the latter, your choices run a continuum of relative perfection. If you have two drives you can merely fire up Toast, choose Audio, choose Audio CD, insert the original into one drive, insert a blank into the other, and click burn.
Yes that's the most simple and straightforward approach. I am doing this for years. But everybody is telling me there is a difference with "exact" and simple copy operations from Audio-CDs, something I never noticed on my Mac. I even did a "diff" check on 2 subsequent rips with iTunes and never found a single byte changed.

Do I miss the point here? ;-)

Cheers, Emilia

PS: I know EAC but I was looking for a Mac solution.

User avatar
Fuga
Posts: 391
Joined: Mon Jun 05, 2006 8:30 pm
Location: Texas

Post by Fuga » Wed Oct 04, 2006 10:18 pm

The only thing you "miss" is that undetected errors can happen. Just because you haven't noticed any, or truly haven't had any, doesn't mean they won't. That's all. Some make a big deal. For my own casual use Toast is fine. If I'm trading in my main place (USENET) I use EAC and will until ...

Post Reply

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest